Bread workshop: It’s all about the buns

I love bread.

The infinite textures and flavours you can create with a base of yeast, flour and water means you will never ever get bored. Add some seeds, maybe some dried fruit, perhaps some pesto. Can’t have wheat? Try the steadily growing range of alternatives and mix with whatever your heart desires. I’m a lover of sourdough and have tried my hand at getting it right (it’s harder than it looks and sounds) and I love experimenting with flavours and shapes – my instagram account reflects this.

Pre-bake brief
Danielle and the team during the pre-baking brief!

Last weekend I was very lucky to attend a bread making workshop with Danielle of Severn Bites. She loves bread too. So much so, she went to France in 2014 for five months to learn the art of the perfect loaf and came back a professional. Originally from a marketing background (so she’s good at communicating to her audience), Danielle has developed classes to appeal to a wide range of people, including people with some bread baking experience like me!

Everything you need for delicious viennoise goodies + Natacha adding the butter to the mix

Late Saturday morning, I picked up the lovely ladies from Yes Starling!, Natacha the Franglaise and My Nothing Book and we took a mini roadtrip to Danielle’s home near Slimbridge. We were greeted with warm smiles and hot soup, along with some homemade foccacia, of course!

Danielle’s fruit mix for the hot cross buns (the peel is homemade and delicious!) + Danielle adding the fruit to the dough

Once we donned aprons, it was down to business. Danielle told us about her experiences in France and gave us a tutorial on baker’s percentages (which I have never used myself) and this was then implemented with our first batch of viennoise dough. I won’t spoil anything here, because you should definitely book in with Danielle to learn a thing or two.

Chocolate viennoise bread
Preparing chocolate viennoise

Despite there being sugar, butter and egg in the dough, it was perfect for a range of breads and we ended up making a total of five different savoury and sweet goodies: burger buns, spiced buns (i.e hot cross buns in this instance), savoury scrolls, small batards and a chocolate loaf. Needless to say, our four hour session was packed to the brim with tips and techniques for replicating the recipes at home.

Preparing the savoury bread scrolls
Preparing the savoury scrolls

And here are the results…

Bread: Viennoise batard + viennoise chocolate loaf + viennoise burger buns
Bread: Viennoise batard + viennoise chocolate loaf + viennoise burger buns
Bread: Hot cross buns + savoury scrolls
Hot cross buns + savoury scrolls

Danielle’s course was a lot of fun and perfect for beginners (and those with a few loaves under their belts will learn plenty too). Danielle is so passionate about bread and it’s contagious. She offers one-on-one sessions and group sessions for up to four people. For information on Danielle’s classes and when the next on is right here.

Thanks for having me Danielle, I had a blast!

 

Chewy chocolate cookies

Now, I’m not saying I make the best cookies in the world, but I am saying that these are pretty damn close.

These chewy chocolate cookies are super simple to make and are sure to be a crowd pleaser (based on my experience every time I make them), which is why I always do a double batch.

The beauty of these cookies is that you can make them whatever you want them to be – a simple chocolate chip or something more fancy like my last batch which included chunks of Terry’s Chocolate Orange, Crispy M&Ms and white chocolate chips. Three of my most favourite things. They are also great with nuts and various lollies/candies.

Ingredients

  • 125 grams butter, chopped and left to come up to room temp
  • 1 teaspoon of vanilla extract (I’ve forgotten it and it’s been fine, but you can also exchange for other flavourings)
  • 275 grams firmly packed brown sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 150 grams plain flour
  • 35 grams self-raising flour
  • .5 teaspoon bicarb soda
  • Pinch salt
  • 35 grams cocoa
  • 150 grams ‘mixins’ of your choice – three types is a good number

 

Method

  1. Preheat the oven to about 180 degrees
  2. Line two trays with baking paper
  3. Beat the butter
  4. Add the sugar, beat until mixed
  5. Add extract and egg and beat until smooth
  6. Add sifted flours, cocoa and bicarb soda
  7. Add ‘mixins’
  8. Mix until combined by hand
  9. You can use a level tablespoon to measure the dough, but I tend to do this by hand and roll them all into balls
  10. Put the balls of dough on the trays, but make sure you leave plenty of space as they will spread during the cooking process
  11. Bake for approximately 10 minutes – they will come out soft, but will set. If you like a crispy cookie, you can leave for longer.
  12. Leave on the tray until they have set and then transfer to a wire rack to cool completely.

By the way, you can make this dough in advance, roll into balls and then freeze them. You can either cook them all up when you need them or just a couple at a time when you’re in desperate need of chocolate and there isn’t anything in the cupboard.

You can easily use whatever mixins you like, here are some ideas:

  • M&Ms – crispy, peanut, plain
  • Chocolate chips – dark, white, milk
  • Caramel/toffee/fudge chunks – you can pick these up in the baking section at the supermarket
  • Nuts – peanuts, roasted almonds, macadamias
  • Reese’s pieces – chopped up
  • Terry’s Chocolate Orange – chopped up
  • Pretzels – broken up
  • After dinner mints – chopped up
  • Crysalised ginger – not for me, but whatever floats your boat

I can definitely recommend scouring the lolly aisle to come up with some fun combinations. I’ve done it many a time and not too many people question why a strange lady is talking to herself while picking up and putting back various packets of chocolate or lollies.

Bristol’s Wapping Wharf, have you been yet?

As a foodie who arrived in Bristol in October last year, one of the first things I heard about was the Wapping Wharf development with all the amazing independent traders, located behind the M Shed in the heart of the city. I went ahead and added a few places to my already growing list of must-try establishments, but didn’t get around to trying anything until recently. Luckily, I got to try five places in one amazing food and drink session with Bristol Bloggers.

Wild Beer Co

Wapping Wharf, Wild Beer Co

We started at Wild Beer Co‘s second establishment, a collaboration with Hook Restaurants – Wild Beer at Wapping Wharf. They have an insane 22 beers available – and they change fairly regularly so you don’t have to drink the same thing more than once, even if you go back twice a month! Obviously, their partnership with Hook means their food focus is on fish and chips.

Wapping Wharf, Wild Beer Co

We were delighted with a range of goodies from their menu, including their classic panko crumbed fish and chips (with one of my most favourite things – hand cut chips!), chicken tacos, vegetable tempura, and a massive fish sharing board, with a load of fresh seafood and fresh foraged goodies. Everything was light and easy to eat, and would match perfectly with so many beers (which is the point, right?).

Wapping Wharf, Wild Beer Co

Speaking of beers, there were so many to choose from I went with ‘Fresh’, a tangy pale ale as recommended by fellow blogger Dan. I only had the one drink, but I could easily go back for more. I asked the assistant manager what she would recommend if you could only have one beer at Wild Beer Co and she waxed lyrical about Sleeping Lemons. When I return I know what I’ll be choosing.

On a related note, Wild Beer have some cool fermaculture events and beer dinners. Check out their Twitter feed to stay up-to-date.

Details
Wild Beer at Wapping Wharf
Units 6-8 Gaol Ferry Steps, Bristol, BS1 5WE
Opening hours: Mon-Sat 12pm to 11pm; Sun 10am to 11pm
Web: wbwappingwharf.com
Phone: 0117 239 5693

Pigsty

Wapping Wharf, Pigsty UK

I had been hearing so many amazing things about Pigsty, particularly about their epic scotch eggs, so I was really stoked to be trying some porky goodies.

It’s located in the cargo part of Wapping Wharf, so it’s very small…or one could say it’s…concentrated. What I’m saying is, make a reservation so you don’t miss out.

Pigsty is the brainchild of The Jolly Hogg team, makers of tasty pork sausages which you can pick up in quite a few supermarkets. Given the feedback they have received about their products, launching a restaurant for the food-loving people of Bristol was the obvious next step. Pigsty serves breakfast, lunch and dinner with a focus on local, RSPCA approved produce, and a menu that will open your eyes to the delights of all things pork (not that I needed any help, I love pork!).

Wapping Wharf, The Jolly Hogg, Pigsty UK

We were offered drinks from their range of local producers, including Wiper and True (I’m a fan of their pale ale!). Then the meaty offerings began – starting with their Pig Board, which can only described as a carnivore’s dream – perfectly roasted pork with stunning crackling, hoguettes (croquettes to everyone else) with baconnaise made with real bacon, a divine mound of pulled pork, one of their famous scotch eggs and salad (but you don’t make friends with salad). Eyes around the table got too big for their bellies on sighting this intense platter and it disappeared pretty quickly. Next up, we had more hoguettes, the Pig Mac burger and a Whole Hog burger (including that very fine roast pork and crackling). Unfortunately, by this point I was really full – as we all were – and I could only manage small bites of the burgers. I could have gone back for more if I knew I wasn’t continuing the food adventure.

Details
Pigsty UK
Units 1&2 Goal Ferry Steps, Bristol, BS1 6WE
Opening hours:
Mon-Fri 7:30am to 10pm, Sat 8:30am to 10pm, Sun 9:30am to 8pm
Web: pigstyuk.com
Phone: 0117 929 7700

Bristol Cider Shop

Wapping Wharf, Bristol Cider Shop

Even though I’ve only been here a few months, I have the impression that the Bristol Cider Shop is a Bristolian institution. I was really impressed with their range and with the fact that they only stock ciders that are produced within 50 miles of Bristol – now that’s drinking local.

The Bristol Cider Shop recently moved to Wapping Wharf so they could expand their offering. They stock more than 100 varieties of cider and perry (draught and bottle), plus other apple products like cider brandy, chutneys and vinegars, hampers, gifts and books. They also host cider tasting sessions at the shop, and tours so you can see the farms and meet the producers.

Wapping Wharf, Bristol Cider Shop

Our quick session at the Bristol Cider Shop started with some delicious mulled cider and a taste of some stunning cider brandy. You could probably spend an entire day at the shop trying the different brands and varieties – you’d go home really drunk and still not try half of their offering.

However, if trying a few ciders and learning a few things about cider in the process is your thing, their tasting sessions are for you. They do a range of sessions including:

  • Introduction to Cider
  • Specific cider types, such as their upcoming Welsh cider session
  • Cheese and cider sessions

In the short time I was at the Bristol Cider Shop, I didn’t need much convincing to attend a tasting session in the near future. Support local by drinking local, take a look at the sessions you can attend here.

Details
The Bristol Cider Shop
Unit 4 Cargo, Gaol Ferry Steps, Wapping Wharf, Bristol BS1 6WE
Opening hours: Tues-Sat 11am to 7pm, Sun 11am to 4pm
Web: bristolcidershop.co.uk
Phone: 0117 929 3203

Little Victories

Wapping Wharf, Little Victories, Small Street Espresso

As someone who isn’t into coffee, Little Victories didn’t pop up on to my radar before we did our tour. However, I’ve bookmarked it to take hubby in the very near future because I know he would love it.

Little Victories is the sister cafe to Small Street Espresso, which owners Chris and John set up in 2012 in the Old City area of Bristol. They had one main goal in mind – bringing great coffee to Bristol, based on the experiences they had in Melbourne (hooray, Australia!), London, Bath and beyond. As a first run, Small Street Espresso was set up on a tight budget with the coffee as the focus. This time around, after seeing signs for the Wapping Wharf development wanting independent traders, Chris and John wanted to create something a bit different and a little more decadent. From this thought, Little Victories was born – a laid back cafe/cocktail joint with clean lines, serving top notch sandwiches and cakes, a huge range of coffee and some super sexy cocktails. I won’t lie, it was a bit like being back at home in Aus.

Wapping Wharf, Little Victories, Small Street Espresso

We were lucky to try their espresso martini and their cold press negroni. As someone who doesn’t drink coffee, I couldn’t do the espresso martini, but I gave the cold press negroni a go – and it was gooooood. Their range of sandwiches and cakes are so good too! I can definitely recommend their lemon cake – supplied by Harts – so moist and tangy. They also have other tidbits from local producers, like salted smoked almonds which I could have eaten all day, and the biggest (and tastiest) olives I’ve ever eaten.

Wapping Wharf, Little Victories, Small Street Espresso

Details
Little Victories, Wapping Wharf
7 Gaol Ferry Steps, Wapping Wharf, Bristol BS1 6WE
Opening hours: Mon-Tues 7:30am to 4:30pm, Weds-Fri 7:30am to 9pm, Sat 9:30am to 9pm, Sun 9:30am to 4:30pm
Twitter: twitter.com/LittleVicsBris
Email:  hi@littlevics.co.uk

Chicken Shed

Wapping Wharf, Chicken Shed, EatDrinkBristolFashion

Our last stop on our Wapping Wharf adventure was the Chicken Shed, one of Bristol Chef, Josh Eggleton’s projects.

At the top of Cargo 1, Chicken Shed has a nice view of the whole development and is quite large in comparison to some of the other eateries downstairs.

Wapping Wharf, Chicken Shed, EatDrinkBristolFashion

They serve free-range, slow grown, GM-free meat from local suppliers, with the philosophy of ‘Happy chickens + happy planet = happy dinners!’. They aren’t your run of the mill chicken restaurant, because not only will you find filthy fried chicken options on the menu, you’ll find things like grilled chicken hearts and deviled livers. I think it’s great that they are aiming for a beak to foot approach.

We began our chicken feast with a seriously spicy Bloody Mary cocktail, made with horseradish vodka. This Aussie girl hasn’t had much in the way of horseradish so it was an interesting experience. Then the food came – deviled chicken livers, grilled chicken hearts on a bed of tzatziki and chermoula, southern fried chicken, spicy chicken wings, coleslaw, spicy fries, a green salad, and a range of dips from house-made aioli to fire-breathing hot sauce.
 Wapping Wharf, Chicken Shed, EatDrinkBristolFashion
I don’t know how we did it. But, we got through most of it. Even though we were very full, the food was excellent and it’s hard to stop when the food is good. Surprisingly, the pick of the night from was the grilled chicken hearts – really well-seasoned and stunning tzatziki and chermoula to finish it off. It was their special for that day, so I hope when you go, you’ll get to try it too.

Details
Chicken Shed
Cargo, Gaol Ferry Steps, Wapping Wharf, Bristol, BS1 6WP
Opening hours: Tues-Thurs 12pm to 10:30pm, Fri-Sat 9am to 10:30pm, Sun 9am to 6pm
Web: eatdrinkbristolfashion.co.uk/chickenshed
Phone: 0117 930 0260

I had a great time checking out what Wapping Wharf has to offer and it was great to meet some fellow food lovers and bloggers in the process.

Honestly, Bristol is a pretty lucky city to have such amazing independent traders offering such amazing food. I have this cool idea for a progressive dinner, doing a different course at each establishment. We’d have to roll home, but I know it would be so worth it.

I can highly recommend visiting each of the places above – each of them offer something different and each offer something amazing.

Cocktail fun at Be At One, Bristol

Before Christmas, hubby and I were lucky to attend a Cocktail Masterclass at Be At One here in Bristol.

We arrived at 4pm and were greeted, seated, and offered a Bellini of our choice. I chose the classic peach and hubby had a mango. Both were delicious, of course. We settled in at the bar while we took in our surroundings – classic decor and comfortable places to sit, a perfect spot for a Sunday sesh or a big night out.

As there were only four of us in this session, we each got to make two cocktails from their extensive menu. And when I say extensive, I really mean it. The only downside is making a decision because you want to try everything. However, the crew at Be At One are all really experienced and could offer a recommendation – I just told our bartender, Matt, what drinks I like (including Singapore Slings and French Martinis) and he told me what he thought I’d enjoy – I had the Monte Casino (gin, apricot brandy, lemon juice, orange bitters and apricot jam) and the Island Fox (gin, Lanique, orange marmalade, grapefuit juice, lime juice and sugar). I really enjoyed both and loved that they included some ingredients I hadn’t come across in cocktails, like jam and Lanique (a rose liqueur). It was also really nice to try some different cocktails, that I may not have otherwise ordered if I’d been out and about in a loud or crowded venue.

Matt showed us a few tips and tricks and stepped us through each of the cocktails we made. It was a hands-on experience that allowed us to try something different. We also walked away with some new skills, which is always a winner for me.

The Masterclass is £25 per person for a 90 minute class. In that time you’ll get to make a cocktail of your choice (and if you’re in a small class, you’ll get to make two!). The masterclasses are great for birthday shindigs, hens or bucks, Christmas parties and something just for fun!

Details:
Be At One, Bristol
55 Queen’s Road, Bristol BS8 1QQ
Opening hours: Mon-Sat – 4:30pm-2:00am, Sun – 4:30pm-11:00pm
Website: www.beatone.co.uk
To book:

Traditional meals in Prague

Much like Estonia, food in the Czech Republic was quite heavy. Basically, meat with carbs and sauce. Also, plenty of beer.

The list of food I wanted to try was extensive, but it wasn’t just sweets. Here are a few of the traditional savoury dishes we tried while travelling around Prague.

Dumplings

On our first day in the city, we walked around what felt like half the city before deciding on a random place we found. We both ended up taking a lunch special – smoked bacon dumplings (pictured above).

Svíčková na smetaně

Beef sirloin in a cream sauce, topped with cranberry and whipped cream. It’s a typical dish that we saw on most menus. I was surprised to find that the sauce was sweet and was made sweeter again with the addition of cranberry. The beef is marinated and slow-cooked, so it’s flavoursome and tender. It’s a heavy dish that will fill you up.

Prague
Svíčková na smetaně + roasted Prague ham with horseradish sauce and potato purée

 

Prague
Roast pork with dumplings and greens + one of the stunning old buildings in the Old Town Square
Pickled sausages

One dish I wasn’t too keen to try was pickled sausage. We got the sausage below at Restaurant U Karla – served with pickled onion and some chilli for a kick. Based on my research, they are considered a ‘pub snack’ of sorts and that would make sense because the acidity works really well with beer.

Prague pickled sausages
Pickled sausages + beer (of course)
Guláš

As you can imagine, goulash is common in this part of the world. It’s another heavy dish, designed to fill you up. I can’t give you any specific recommendations, but we tried it at both Cafe Savoy and Restaurant U Karla and enjoyed both.

Prague goulash
Guláš (goulash) + beer (of course)
Smažený sýr

When fried cheese is an option, you’d be mad not to try it. Plus, it’s everything you imagine it is – crunchy, stretchy, cheesey. A thick slice of cheese (often Edam) is breaded and then fried. In the two cases we tried it, it was served with amazing hand cut chips, and some tartare sauce. I can definitely recommend trying this dish – it’s probably best as a main or shared for a starter.

Prague Smažený sýr
Smažený sýr (fried cheese) + the main entrance at Prague Castle

Prague is a beautiful city and I look forward to going back one day. I can definitely recommend at least a 3-day trip so you can see and eat as much as you can.

Prague Charles Bridge
View of Charles Bridge from the river + view of Prague on the way back down the hill from Strahov Monastery

Thanks for sharing in our Prague adventure, here’s to the next one!

White Christmas: an Aussie tradition

It’s been a while since I’ve made White Christmas. To be honest, I really don’t like raisins and sultanas or fruit peel, so I’ve never made it traditionally anyway. However, this year, I’m doing Christmas in a new country with new people and I wanted to take something to work that was uniquely Australian. The only thing I could think of was White Christmas.

I had to search for a Copha equivalent and then scoured Tesco for milk powder. Eventually, I got everything I needed and made a batch.

Recipe:

  • 250gms vegetable shortening such as Copha or Trex
  • 2 cups rice puffs
  • 3/4 cup icing sugar
  • 1 cup milk powder
  • 1 cup desiccated coconut
  • 1 cup dried fruit
  • Glace cherries for the top (though I like to chop some up and put them in the mixture too)

Method:

  1. Combine all the dry ingredients in a bowl
  2. Melt the vegetable shortening
  3. Add the shortening to the bowl of dry ingredients and mix it well (carefully)
  4. Transfer the mixture to a lined tin/tray
  5. Top with glace cherries
  6. Let it sit in the fridge until set
  7. Cut up and enjoy

When I’ve made this in the past I’ve used dried apricots and cherries instead of raisins/sultanas and glace cherries. I figure this is far more Australian anyway given they are summer fruits. I think you could put dried mango in there too, just to make it even more ‘summery’.

I think my colleagues enjoyed this uniquely Australian sweet and I might make my version for them next year!

What do you put in your White Christmas?

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I scream, you scream, we all scream for… Swoon Gelato

Do you know the difference between ice cream and gelato? I didn’t until recently when I was lucky to attend a bloggers’ evening at Swoon Gelato for a sneak peek of their Christmas treats.

If you were wondering, the answer to that question: gelato contains less fat (win!) because the recipes use less cream. It’s also churned slower than ice cream which means it contains less air and has a super creamy texture. Swoon likes to say that all of this essentially means you can eat twice as much (and I think they make an excellent point).

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Swoon treated us to some absolutely stunning gelato and gelato-focused desserts, all made here in Bristol.

Pat and her team got things started with mango gelato Bellinis! Genius! I’ve tried putting mango sorbet in lemonade before and it didn’t work as well as I’d hoped. But, prosecco and mango gelato worked really well – I can definitely recommend it for your next shindig!

Swoon Gelato - welcome
Swoon Gelato mango Bellini + Pam’s welcome + what you don’t see from a blogger event

Next, we were treated to Swoon’s core range of gelato and sorbetto. As always, I used the salted caramel flavour as a benchmark to compare against other gelato and ice cream I’ve tried. It was perfect – just the right amount of salt, plenty of caramel, and as mentioned previously, super creamy. While I really enjoyed everything I tried, their core flavours that I highly recommend are: salted caramel (obviously), chocolate and chilli sorbetto (which is a must-try if you love rich chocolate with a little kick, plus from memory I believe it’s vegan), and pistachio (the best version of pistachio I’ve ever tried).

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The dessert cabinet at Swoon.

As a little twist, Pam gave us the chance to make some gelato with the chef (who has trained extensively to make the best gelato at an actual gelato school – though, in Italian it sounded so much better). While I was helping with a batch of creamy vanilla gelato, everyone else crowded around the cabinet and tried some of the Christmas specials, including a mince pie flavour!

Swoon Gelato
Making gelato.

After successfully creating a batch vanilla gelato it was time to test Swoon’s Christmas dessert range. They have a lot on offer, and we tried: the Italian version of buche de Noel – a sponge roulade filled with, you guessed it, gelato; pannetone filled with gelato; and some stunning macarons filled with gelato (it’s hard to find a good macaron, but these were chewy and crunchy – perfect with the creamy gelato).

Swoon Gelato
Some of the desserts at Swoon.

By this point, I think it’s fair to say we were all in sugared out, but content. I can honestly say I adored everything I tried and I’m looking forward to taking hubby to test it all out in the very near future.

Thank you so much to Pat and the Swoon team for looking after us and sharing your delicious gelato and sorbetto.

The details:
Swoon Gelato
31a College Green, Bristol BS1 5TB
Open: Every day, 10am – 10:30pm
Web: www.swoononaspoon.co.uk

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Christmas gift guide for the foodie in your life

Every Christmas people ask, ‘what do you want for Christmas?’ and every year I don’t know what to say. I can imagine I’m not the only person who goes through this, so I’ve put together this Christmas Gift Guide to make things easy!

If you’re buying for a foodie friend (or for yourself) here are some great gift options:

COOKING CLASSES

Brisbane: Experience Sunnybank cooking school
A three-hour hands-on class where you’ll learn from a master. You’ll prepare five recipes from either Banquet style, Chinese peasant or Yum cha (and get to eat is obviously!).
Cost: I believe the class is around $80 per person, but give the organisation a call on 3345 7500 to check or make a booking.

Bristol: Little Kitchen Cookery School
Classes range from seasonal goodies (i.e. Christmas) to breadmaking, sugarcraft and vegetarian cookery.  You can buy vouchers as gift or just making the booking for your foodie friend.
Cost: £40-60 per person

 

FOOD TOURS

Brisbane: Foodi Chocolate Walking Tour
A three-hour tour encompassing four of Brisbane’s best chocolatiers. Not only will you learn about chocolate production, you’ll get to sample plenty.
Cost: $49 per person

Bristol: The Bristol Food Tour
This three-hour tour aims to showcase the best independent food and drink vendors in the Bristol. I’ve seen nothing but excellent reviews and I’m looking forward to going myself.
Cost: £35 per person

 

HIGH TEA

Brisbane: Matcha High Tea at Sinmei Tea Rooms at Scrumptious Reads
Matcha is super popular right now and you’ll find it in liquid and food form all over the place. Sinmei has amazing matcha and you’ll get to try some of their matcha sweets (which change regularly) along with something green to wash it all down.
Cost: $35 per person

PS. Scrumptious Reads is a brilliant place to find cook books!

Bristol: Classic Afternoon Tea for two at Chin! Chin!
A selection of delicious finger sandwiches, scones, cakes & treats, and tea or coffee. You can buy vouchers if you’re giving it as a gift to another couple.
Cost: £29.90 (PS. Keep an eye on Wriggle for deals!)

 

FINE DINING

Brisbane: Friday Night Supper Club at Montrachet
Chef Shannon Kellam puts together a seasonal, regional and creative 5-course menu that changes every two weeks. This is outside their main menu and is only available on Friday nights. Seating is always limited, so I recommend making a reservation well in advance.
Cost: $110 per person

Bristol: Lunch or dinner at Casamia
Recently awarded ‘Best Restaurant’ and ‘Best Fine Dining Wine List’, this is the perfect place to take a special foodie someone.
Cost: £98 per person

 

FOOD/DRINKS

Brisbane: Dello Mano brownies
A box of Australia’s best brownies will make anyone’s day, even if they aren’t a foodie! If you don’t want to get them brownies (one would ask why!), they make amazing cakes too.
Cost: From $16

Bristol: Swoon Gelato voucher
Obviously gelato melts, so the best way to get your foodie friend some Swoon gelato is by getting them a voucher. They do a stunning range of flavours which can be bought in various sizes, plus cakes and other gelato based goodies.
Cost: As much as you want to spend!

Bristol: Bluebird Tea Co. gift boxes
Bluebird not only have divine tea, they are mixologists and come up with some stunning blends (both seasonal and regular), like Christmas cake, Mulled cider, gingerbread chai, dark choc chilli chai and Dozy Girl Chamomile (one of the ones I have). They have a range of tea gifts available, such as tea cocktail kits.
Cost: £5-27

 

GADGETS
4-in-1 Polygon measuring spoon
Even though this is still on Kickstarter, I think these spoons are ingenious! For the price you get a set of spoons – one tablespoon and one teaspoon. Expected delivery is January 2017 and I think any foodie would appreciate such an innovative gift.
Cost: $8 USD

The Whisk Wiper
Sadly, the whisk wiper isn’t yet available for purchase as the designers need to fill Kickstarter orders first. However, you can sign up for updates. In this case, print out a picture and put it in a card for your foodie friend so they know your plan!
Cost: TBC

Custom embossed rolling pins
If your foodie friend is a keen baker, they will love these rolling pins. While there are quite a few etsy stores selling them, you can get them from Valek too. They have a big range available.
Cost: €20-40

 

BOOKS

River Cottage A-Z
I won’t lie, I’m looking forward to owning this book. I went to the Bristol launch and hearing Hugh talk about the recipes made it sound even better.
Cost: £26.00 in the UK on Amazon | $59.95 in Aus at Booktopia

Chocolate by Kirsten Tibballs
I went to one of the launches for this book and really enjoyed seeing Kirsten talk about chocolate and make chocolate goodies (for us to try). The book has stunning images and recipes for all experience levels.
Cost: $44.50 in Aus  at Savour School | £16.59 on Amazon

Jamie Oliver’s Christmas Cook Book
As a big fan of Jamie, Mel is super keen to get her hands on this one.
Cost: £11.99 on Amazon | $29.99 in Aus at QBD

We hope you’ll find something you’ll love here! We’d love to hear your ideas in the comments below too!

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The first Bristol pizza festival

Yesterday, we went to the first event Bristol pizza festival, organised by Foozie. Five of the region’s pizza vendors plus craft beers, and Prosecco. Honestly, with that combination it’s hard to go wrong!

It’s exciting to be part of something that is happening for the first time. Especially if it involves food!

Tickets were only £14 and included four pizza tokens (which could get you a whole pizza or four quarters). Thankfully, there were only 500 tickets available. Gosh, in Australia you’d pay $20 and you’d get nothing, plus you’d spend the day lining up and go home cranky because you only managed to get once slice.

On top of a good range of pizza options, each pizza vendor developed a Bristol themed pizza for the event and attendees could get a quarter as part of their ticket. I thought this was a stroke of brilliance because I’m a big fan of having a bit of everything so you don’t have to decide on just one thing!

I really liked the venue too – The Station on Silver Street! The beauty of being new in town means so many of these places are new to me and we often have nothing like them in Brisbane.

As a fussy pizza eater, I decided before I went in that I would judge each of the themed pizzas, so here goes:

Pizzarova
Bristol Temple Meats – Fior Di Latte mozzarella, pancetta, ‘nduja sausage and salami Milano topped with chilli or garlic oil
I really enjoyed the flavour and texture of the dough and as far as ‘meatlovers’ pizzas go, it was pretty good! I’m a big fan of ‘nduja, so I enjoyed its firey punch.

Bristol Pizza Festival - Pizzarova

Mission Pizza
Massive Cheese Attack – cream, fire-roasted pear, Cornish Blue cheese, Fior di Latte mozzarella, Fontina, cracked black pepper, a drizzle of honey
This pizza was my number 2. The base was well-cooked and I loved the combination of flavours – the stand outs, of course, being the sweet pear and sharp blue cheese – strong but surprisingly smooth (and I’m not usually a lover of blue cheese!).

Bristol Pizza Festival - Mission Pizzas

Woodchop Pizza
PeSSto Great Britain – pesto, salami from Somerset Charcuterie and sun-dried tomatoes
Unfortunately, I think they were too busy at the time we got our PeSSto Great Britain because the base just wasn’t cooked enough. Toppings-wise, I felt the sundried tomatoes didn’t add to the overall flavour and we couldn’t taste any pesto. The Somerset Charcuterie salami was really nice though.

Bristol Pizza Festival - Woodchop Pizza

Pizza Bike
Drizzle in Brizzle – sourdough base, tomato sauce, Cheddar cheese, fresh herbs, pesto, oils
Pizza Bike had my favourite tomato base – tangy and flavourful. Unfortunately, the pizza was really difficult to eat because the base was quite soggy or undercooked, I couldn’t tell which. I really like flavour of the base though. As a sourdough lover, I’m keen to buy some of their bases to make pizza at home without the mess!

Bristol Pizza Festival - Pizza Bike

Winner – Baz & Fred
The Young Mucker – tomato, mozzarella, fennel sausage and tenderstem broccoli
For me this pizza was the winner. The based was cooked perfectly, making it easy to eat (I could eat it one-handed without the topping going everywhere). I also loved the combination and taste of the toppings – aromatic fennel always goes well with pork, and the broccoli was perfectly cooked.

Bristol Pizza Festival - Baz and Fred

Thanks for putting together Bristol’s first pizza festival, Foozie; I’m looking forward to the next one!

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My new home – Bristol

If you’ve been following our Instagram feed and even our Facebook page, you’ll have noticed by now that I’m no longer travelling per se. We arrived in Bristol on 3 October and have been living in AirBnBs while job hunting and being tourists.

When I tell people we’ve relocated here they usually ask why. But not just, ‘why did you move to Bristol?’, it’s more like, ‘why the hell would you choose to move to the UK? It’s so much nicer in Australia!’. Obviously I then have to explain that a lot of Australians do it because it’s cheaper to travel all over Europe while living in the UK. Most people nod in understanding, but their faces say otherwise haha.

Bristol food
Eat a pitta falafels from St Nicholas markets + Moroccan from St Nicholas markets + salad from The Stable, Bristol

Once past the moving to the UK question, they ask why we chose Bristol over London. It’s probably a fair question because London is effectively the centre of everywhere. And that’s exactly why we didn’t want to live there – too big, takes too long to get anywhere, too expensive, too many people vying for the same jobs…you get the idea. Coming from Brisbane, I wasn’t sure we could handle something so massive. When I researched, Bristol popped up in a lot of ‘great places to live’ lists and it seemed like it had a really great cultural feel. I say ‘we’ a lot, but Husband didn’t really have a lot to do with it, he was happy for me to choose.

Bristol food
A lane near our first AirBnB + eating a locally made sausage roll at Bristol’s harbourside market

So far, we’ve loving it here. Even Husband is keen to stay (though finding a job has been a tough task for him). The food scene is so vibrant – there are pop ups, new restaurants (and the old ones), markets and events. I know Brisbane had all of those things, but it’s on a smaller scale here. For example, we’re going to a pizza festival on Saturday and they only sold 500 tickets. In Brisbane, an event like that would be open to thousands of people; making it a crowded experience with more time spent in queues than actually enjoying the atmosphere and food.

Bristol
Blaise Castle + picnic in the park

Regardless of the food, every day feels like an adventure as we walk around finding new and interesting things. We’re yet to make new friends, but I’m sure we will. I went to a food blogging event on Monday night and there’s so much camaraderie within the blogging scene here – it’s lovely to see. There will be plenty of posts on here about Bristol, Bath and beyond, as well as the places farther afield (we’re still trying to work out what to do for Christmas at this point!).

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The Georgian kitchen at Bristol’s Georgian House Museum + breakfast at a new ‘Melbourne-style’ cafe in Stokes Croft where we are staying now

My favourite adventure to date was meeting Hugh from River Cottage. As many of your know, I’m a big fan! We went to the launch lunch of his new book, The River Cottage A-Z, at River Cottage Canteen and I basically gushed at him (poor guy). The food was really amazing too – simple, full of flavour and very very British. I’m looking forward to going back there for a celebratory meal once I’ve been offered a job.

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Me and Hugh + Hugh’s autograph + one of the taster platters from the lunch at River Cottage Canteen

Expect to see more of our adventures in the English West Country!

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